Random Bits and Pieces of Nothing

peaceheather:

mickimouto:

it’s all fun and games until someone kicks the nob by accident

that last cat at the end tho

such a beautiful place, to be with friends.

A philosopher once asked, “Are we human because we gaze at the stars, or do we gaze at them because we are human?” Pointless, really.

                   ”Do the stars gaze back?” Now  t h a t ’ s  a question.

Captain, can I have money for a slinky dress?

frakkingtoasterlover:

We are gonna make it all the way.

Athena/Helo in every episode - S01E03 “Bastille Day”

noahandquinn:

hp meme | three colours [1/3]
↳  yellow

canis-familiaris:

Bucky manages to avoid being found until one night, with no warning, he shows up in Tony’s kitchen.  Tony is understandably kind of alarmed when he finds an assassin sitting at his table, but Bucky just kind of holds his arm out toward Tony and very quietly tells him, “I don’t know how to fix it myself.”  

littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:

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"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.image

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LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONEimage

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benshaws:

little asoiaf daemon au separation thoughts

  • all separation occurs through some sort of magic, whether their owners are fully aware of it or not. for example, wargs have an innate ability to separate from their daemon - however, individuals like the starks maybe not realize they have this ability, and it manifests differently in all of them.
  • because i’ve mentioned them first: wargs. as i said, wargs have an innate ability to separate from their daemon, and human and daemon can act independently of one another (like with witches in hdm). those who grow up with the knowledge they are a warg learn to do this fairly quickly, however the starks all posses different levels of this ability. sansa and robb, for example, doesn’t utilize or realize they have this ability, while bran, jon and arya can all separate themselves and unlocking this ability happens for them due to different triggers. bran, for example, unlocks the ability through his fall and help of bloodraven while jon unlocks it at the ranger ceremony (although doesn’t realize until later). wargs can also skinchange into people’s daemons, just as they can skinchange into a person if they want to. skinchanging into someone’s daemon is as taboo as skinchanging into another human being.
  • years ago, when the true purpose of the night’s watch was remembered, rangers became separated from their daemon’s when they took their vows. although they retained the emotional connection to their daemon, this separation meant their daemons could range further ahead of them in scouts, or bird daemons could fly above and scout for attacks. this separation does not allow their daemons to travel hundreds of miles away from them, but it does allow them to travel much further than they might otherwise (miles rather than feet). now this magic has been lost, and only individuals like jon, who has innate magical capacity, feel the effect of the vows on their daemon.
  • some magic users, red priests for example, manage to separate themselves to varying degrees of success. often how well the separation goes depends on the experience, talent or fate of the caster but generally the success rate is low. often daemon or human is irreversibly damaged or killed in the procedure. more often than not magic users use separation as a sacrifice and as a source of power - these sort of procedures are performed on street children etc. the outcome can vary massively, but most children don’t live. varys was one of the ‘lucky’ ones who survived the ordeal, and he still retains a tenuous connection to his spider daemon. while this means varys’ daemon can travel a great distance and act independently, both daemon and human have lost the sort of emotional connection they once had to one another. the unsullied are separated from their daemon’s (although their daemon’s still exist physically, as one can’t exist without the other) in order to make better soldiers, many children who go through this ordeal do not survive.
  • the faceless men however, have another form of separation altogether.  they have learnt how to unsettle their daemon’s again, so they return to the state they were as children. this means they can shift their daemon with their features. again this process involves another form of severing the emotional connection to their daemon, although the process is somewhat different as daemons can not travel any further than they could originally, only change form.
  • many mistakenly believe wildlings/free folk are separated from their daemons, a misconception generated through prejudice and the fact that wildlings daemon’s can often travel further from their human than those who live in westeros and the cities. however, wildlings daemons can only move feet further away from their human, rather than miles like skinchangers or others who have been separated. this adaptation has developed to help the free folk survive in their environment, and especially aid them against predators and to hunt.
  • there’s a general prejudice against those who are separated from their daemon’s, and even those who are unwillingly separated are likely to face hate crimes against them. many who are separated chose to pretend they aren’t, such as varys.