Random Bits and Pieces of Nothing

faerytale-wings:

Dis, her Mother and Grandmother. (Thrain and Thror’s wives) 

I decided the lovely Dwarf women deserved a photoset of their own.

rosalarian:

pourquoi-nutmeg:

nortonism:

The thing about this is that sculptures like these in art history were for the male gaze. Photoshop a phone to it and suddenly she’s seen as vain and conceited. That’s why I’m 100% for selfie culture because apparently men can gawk at women but when we realize how beautiful we are we’re suddenly full of ourselves…

YES.

Girls don’t let anyone tell you loving yourself is vanity.

rosalarian:

pourquoi-nutmeg:

nortonism:

The thing about this is that sculptures like these in art history were for the male gaze. Photoshop a phone to it and suddenly she’s seen as vain and conceited. That’s why I’m 100% for selfie culture because apparently men can gawk at women but when we realize how beautiful we are we’re suddenly full of ourselves…

YES.

Girls don’t let anyone tell you loving yourself is vanity.

sttngfashion:

Reader Claire sent us this awesome photo of “24th Century Casualwear” that is basically 100% perfect. As she explains it: “I met all the basic requirements: asymmetrical hemlines; color blocking; secondary colors; inappropriate fabrics (the top is made of wool felt); and weird straps that don’t serve an obvious purpose.” This color story of dried-blood brown, deep mustard, and Eddie Bauer 1997 Hunter Green is absolutely something we’d see on one of the Enterprise’s non-uniformed denizens.

I also LOVE the little “purse” she made to go with it! Claire says: “I designed the labels on my computer and had them printed on bumper sticker stock; the black lines are Chartpak tape, which is what they used to do all those lines on props and sets on the show.”

A+ COSPLAY, CLAIRE. You are ready for a casual coffee date at Ten Forward.

dduane:

Some fascinating stuff here. But this bit brought me up short.

Though Victorian people were swearing in much the same way that we do today, not all the bad words of the time are as familiar as fucking bitch. Many of these words rich and strange are not swearwords per se but terms for topics so esoterically taboo that they would never have come up in polite conversation. In his 1785 “Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue,” Francis Grose includes to huffle, which is “a piece of bestiality too filthy for explanation.” (The 1788 and 1823 editions decide that discretion is the better part of valor and fail to mention the bestial practice at all.) Grose also lists “to bagpipe, a lascivious practice too indecent for explanation.” Even Farmer and Henley, brave champions of obscenity who boldly explained fucking, refuse to define to bagpipe in their dictionary — they simply repeat Grose’s definition manqué. One hopes for something really spectacular from these words, but they are simply the Victorian version of blow job, slang for fellatio, a practice evidently much more shocking one or two centuries ago. Another popular Victorian word for this lascivity was gamahuche. It derives from French, so it probably was a euphemism used in order to lift the tone of huffle and bagpipe out of the gutter. It more properly means “mouth on genitals,” as it can be used for both fellatio and cunnilingus.

"Huffle…", though. Oh dear. (Leaving us with the terrible possibility that in some circumstances, "hufflepuff" is a verb.)

Now a new kind of confidence is lighting up inside of me, because I think I finally know who Haymitch is. And I’m beginning to know who I am. And surely, two people who have caused the Capitol so much trouble can think of a way to get Peeta home alive.

skephers:

The Lupins

partly inspired by (×)

We also are daughters of the great, and we have wills and courage of our own. Therefore do not bend. Once bend a little, and they will bend you further until you are bowed down. Sink your roots into the rock, and face the wind, though it blow away all your leaves.